THC D8 + limonene

Delta-8-THC is one of the four major cannabinoids present in dried. In total, some experts estimate that there are 113 cannabinoids. While delta-8-THC may be one of the most common, it still often makes up far less than 1 percent in dried flower. In fact, there’s often only about 0.01 percent delta-8-THC in dried cannabis flower.

Apart from THC, the other common cannabinoids include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). Like “regular” THC, delta-8 is psychoactive. Though, it is considered slightly less psychoactive than it’s more famous relative.

In terms of potency, research suggests that the psychoactive strength of delta-8 can be compared to THC in a 2:3 ratio. This means that it is more potent than tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), which is thought to be responsible for the zippy, energetic high present in some strains. THCV only has a potency of about 25 percent of THC.

Delta-8-THC connects with the same primary landing sites as the traditional THC. This landing site is known as cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and facilitates a wide variety of bodily functions, including mood, memory, pain, movement, sleep, and more.

The cannabinoid has also been found to connect with the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), which lends a hand in immune system communication.

Rodent studies show that delta-8 also boosts a particular chemical in the brain that plays a role in learning and memory. That chemical is the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Deficiencies in acetylcholine are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and other memory and cognitive problems. In fact, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute, early research on delta-8-THC has shown that the chemical may have several beneficial effects. These include:

  • Anti-anxiety
  • Appetite-stimulation
  • Pain relief
  • Neuroprotection

Researchers have also looked into the benefits of non-psychoactive derivatives of this molecule. This shows that the compound may be useful for the potential creation of new pharmaceutical drugs.

Some delta-8-THC derivatives, researchers speculate, may be helpful in conditions asthma, systemic anaphylaxis, and septic shock. Others are being studied for interstitial cystitis, as well as for inflammation and pain-relieving effects. Unlike delta-8-THC, many derivatives are thought to be non-psychoactive.

Limonene takes its name from the lemon, as the rind of the lemon, like other citrus fruits, contains considerable amounts of this compound, which contributes to their odor. Limonene is a chiral molecule, and biological sources produce one enantiomer: the principal industrial source, citrus fruit, contains d-limonene ((+)-limonene), which is the (R)-enantiomerRacemic limonene is known as dipentene.[2] d-Limonene is obtained commercially from citrus fruits through two primary methods: centrifugal separation or steam distillation.
d-Limonene applied to skin may cause irritation, but otherwise appears to be safe for human uses

Limonene is a monocyclic monoterpenoid and one of two major compounds formed from pinene. As the name suggests, varieties high in limonene have strong citrusy smells like oranges, lemons and limes. Strains high in limonene promote a general uplift in mood and attitude. This citrusy terpene is the major constituent in citrus fruit rinds, rosemary, juniper and peppermint, as well as in several pine needle oils.

Limonene is highly absorbed by inhalation and quickly appears in the bloodstream. It assists in the absorption of other terpenes through the skin and other body tissue. It is well documented that limonene suppresses the growth of many species of fungi and bacteria, making it an ideal antifungal agent for ailments such as toenail fungus. Limonene may be beneficial in protecting against various cancers, and orally administered limonene is currently undergoing clinical trials in the treatment of breast cancer. Limonene has been found to even help promote weight-loss.

Plants use limonene as a natural insecticide to ward off predators. Limonene was primarily used in food and perfumes until a couple of decades ago, when it became better known as the main active ingredient in citrus cleaner. It has very low toxicity and adverse effects are rarely associated with it.